Neither Black Nor White: Intermarriages and Mischlinge during the Third Reich



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Nuremberg Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor,
September 15, 1935


Moved by the understanding that purity of the German Blood is the essential condition for the continued existence of the German people, and inspired by the inflexible determination to ensure the existence of the German Nation for all time, the Reichstag has unanimously adopted the following Law, which is promulgated herewith:

Article 1.

1) Marriages between Jews and subjects of the state of German or related blood are forbidden. Marriages nevertheless concluded are invalid, even if concluded abroad to circumvent this law.

2) Annulment proceedings can be initialed only by the State Prosecutor.

Article 2.

Extramarital intercourse between Jews and subjects of the state of German or related blood is forbidden.

Article 3.

Jews may not employ in their households female subjects of the state of German or related blood who are under 45 years old.

Article 4.

1) Jews are forbidden to fly the Reich or National flag or to display the Reich colors. They are, on the other hand, permitted to display the Jewish colors. The exercise of this right is protected by the State.

Article 5.

(1) Any person who violates the prohibition under §1 will be punished by a prison sentence with hard labor.

(2) A male who violates the prohibition under § 2 will be punished with a prison sentence with or without hard labor.

(3) Any person violating the provisions under § 3 or §4 will be punished with a prison sentence of up to one year and a fine, or with one or the other of these penalties.

Article 6.

The Reich Minister of the Interior, in coordination with the Deputy of the Führer and the Reich Minister of Justice, will issue the Legal and Administrative regulations required to implement and complete this Law.

Article 7.

The Law takes effect on the day following promulgations except for §3, which goes into force on January 1, 1936. 

Nuremberg, September 15, 1935 at the Reich Party Congress of Freedom

The Führer and Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler
The Reich Minister of the Interior Frick
The Reich Minister of Justice Dr. Gürtner
The Deputy of the Führer R. Hess