Curriculum Vitae

Cyrus C.M. Mody

 

Employment:

Associate Professor, Department of History, Rice University, 2014-present

Assistant Professor, Department of History, Rice University, 2007-2014

Program Manager, Nanotechnology and Innovation Studies, Center for Contemporary History and Policy, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2005-2007

Other affiliations:

External collaborator, Center for Nanotechnology in Society, University of California – Santa Barbara, 2005-present

Fellow, Center for Contemporary History and Policy, Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2007-present

Rice Cultures of Energy Mellon/Sawyer Seminar participant, 2012-13

Degrees:

Ph.D., Cornell University, in Science and Technology Studies, August 2004

M.A., Cornell University, in Science and Technology Studies, January 2001

A.B., Harvard University, (magna cum laude) in Engineering Sciences, June 1997

Fellowships and awards:

Paul Bunge Prize, Hans-R.-Jenemann-Stiftung, 2014.

Cushing Memorial Prize, University of Notre Dame Program in History and Philosophy of Science, 2013.

(with Sonali Shah) “Rising Stars” Best Paper Award, Industry Studies Association, 2013.

National Science Foundation Scholar’s Award “The Long Arm of Moore’s Law: New Institutions for Microelectronics Research, 1966-2004,” SES 1027160, 2011-12.

Collaborative Research Fellowship (with Hyungsub Choi, Patrick McCray, and Mara Mills) for “Micro-Histories and Nano-Futures: The Co-Production of Miniaturization and Futurism,” American Council of Learned Societies, spring 2011.

Fellow, Center for Interdisciplinary Research group “Science in the Context of Application,” Universität Bielefeld, in residence June-July 2007

Gordon Cain Fellowship in Technology, Policy, and Entrepreneurship, Chemical Heritage Foundation, in residence September 2004-June 2005

Hacker/Mullins Prize for best graduate student paper, American Sociological Association section on Science, Knowledge, and Technology, awarded August 2003

Sloan Foundation/National Bureau of Economic Research, Science and Engineering Workforce Project fellowship, awarded January 2003

Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation Fellowship, National Museum of American History, in residence June-August 2002

Chemical Heritage Foundation travel grant, awarded April 2002

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Electrical History Fellowship, awarded April 2001

National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant number SES 0094582, awarded December 2000

Mullins Prize for best graduate student paper, Society for Social Studies of Science, awarded September 2000

American Institute of Physics grant-in-aid for dissertation research, awarded August 2000

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, awarded April 1997

Current projects in progress:

Cyrus C.M. Mody, The Long Arm of Moore’s Law: Microelectronics and American Science [2nd monograph project].

Cyrus C.M. Mody, Through Change and through Storm: American Physical and Engineering Scientists in the Long 1970s [3rd monograph project].

Publications:

Citation information from Google Scholar can be found here.

Dissertation: “Crafting the Tools of Knowledge: The Invention, Spread, and Commercialization of Probe Microscopy, 1960-2000.”

Book: Cyrus C.M. Mody, Instrumental Community: Probe Microscopy and the Path to Nanotechnology (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2011).

      Reviews of Instrumental Community:

Chris Toumey, “Probing the History of Nanotechnology,” Nature Nanotechnology 7.4 (2012): 205-206.

Sarah Kaplan, review of Instrumental Community by Cyrus C.M. Mody, Administrative Science Quarterly 57 (2): 348-352.

Rebecca Slayton, “An Instrumental Concept,” Social Studies of Science 42.5 (2012): 787-792.

Sean Johnston, review of Instrumental Community by Cyrus C.M. Mody, Technology and Culture 54 (2013): 221-223.

P.W. Hawkes, “Scribble, Scribble, Scribble” [“recent publications of interest to ultramicroscopists are surveyed”], Ultramicroscopy 126 (2013): 60-76.

Marina Maestrutti, review of Instrumental Community by Cyrus C.M. Mody, Ambix 60.2 (2013): 197-198.

Christian Kehrt, review of Instrumental Community by Cyrus C.M. Mody, ICON: The Journal of the International Committee for the History of Technology 19 (2013): 227-229.

John P. DiMoia, “Projecting the Future: The Shifting Boundaries of Postwar American Science” [review of Biomedical Computing: Digitizing Life in the United States; Instrumental Community: Probe Microscopy and the Path to Nanotechnology; Genentech: Beginnings of Biotech; The Visioneers: How a Group of Elite Scientists Pursued Space Colonies, Nanotechnologies, and a Limitless Future by Joseph A. November; Cyrus C. M. Mody; Sally Smith Hughes; W. Patrick McCray], Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 44.1 (2014): 90-98.

Brock, David C., “Network Effects: Communities, Devices, and Disciplines,” Metascience 23 (2014): 113-116.

Ann Johnson, review of Instrumental Community by Cyrus C.M. Mody, Isis 105 (2014): 251-252.

Andrew L. Russell, review of Instrumental Community by Cyrus C.M. Mody, Enterprise & Society 15 (2014): 403-405.

Peer-reviewed journal articles:

Sonali K. Shah and Cyrus C.M. Mody, “How Do Users Develop and Diffuse Their Innovations? Resources, New Social Structures, and Scaffolding,” Organization Science (submitted).

Kevin F. Kelly and Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Molecular Electronics: Catching up with Its Promise?,” IEEE Spectrum (submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Santa Barbara, Physics, and the Long 1970s,” Physics Today 66.9: (September, 2013): 31-37.

Cyrus C.M. Mody and Hyungsub Choi, “From Materials Science to Nanotechnology: Institutions, Communities, and Disciplines at Cornell University, 1960-2000,” Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 43.2 (2013): 121-161.

Cyrus C.M. Mody and Andrew J. Nelson, “‘A Towering Virtue of Necessity’: Computer Music at Vietnam-Era Stanford,” Osiris 28 [Music in the Laboratory] (2013): 254-277.

Cyrus C.M. Mody and Michael Lynch, “Test Objects and Other Epistemic Things: A History of a Nanoscale Object,” British Journal for the History of Science 43.3 (2010): 423-458.[*]

Hyungsub Choi and Cyrus C.M. Mody, “The Long History of Molecular Electronics: Microelectronics Origins of Nanotechnology,” Social Studies of Science 39.1 (2009): 11-50.[†]

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “The Larger World of Nano,” Physics Today 61.10 (2008): 38-44.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Corporations, Universities, and Instrumental Communities: Commercializing Probe Microscopy, 1981-1996,” Technology and Culture 47 (2006): 56-80.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “The Sounds of Science: Listening to Laboratory Practice,” Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (2005): 175-198.[‡]

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Small, But Determined: Technological Determinism in Nanoscience,” Hyle/Techné (special joint issue on nanotechnology) 10 (2004): 99-128 [reprinted in Joachim Schummer and Davis Baird, Nanotechnology Challenges: Implications for Philosophy, Ethics, and Society (New Jersey: World Scientific, 2006): 95-130].

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “A Little Dirt Never Hurt Anyone: Knowledge-Making and Contamination in Materials Science,” Social Studies of Science 31 (2001): 7-36[§] [reprinted in Susan Silbey, Law and Science, volume II (Burlington: Ashgate, 2008): 305-334].

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “‘A New Way of Flying’: Différance, Rhetoric, and the Autogiro in Interwar Aviation,” Social Studies of Science 30 (2000): 513-543.[**]

Edited volume contributions:

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “‘An Electro-Historical Focus with Real Interdisciplinary Appeal’: Interdisciplinarity at Vietnam-Era Stanford,” for Critical Sociologies of Interdisciplinary Research, ed. Scott Frickel, Mathieu Albert, and Barbara Prainsack (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “What Do Scientists and Engineers Do All Day?  On the Structure of Scientific Normalcy,” in Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50 Years On [Boston Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science] (Dordrecht: Springer, submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Fabricating an Organizational Field for Research: US Academic Microfabrication Facilities in the 1970s and 1980s,” in Intellectual and Organizational Innovation in Science: Historical and Sociological Perspectives, ed. Thomas Heinze and Richard Münch (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, in revision).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “The Market and the Garden: Santa Barbara Physicists in the Vietnam Era,” for Groovy Science: The Counter-Cultures and Scientific Life, 1955-1975, ed. David Kaiser and W. Patrick McCray (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, in revision).

Sonali K. Shah and Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Creating a Context for Entrepreneurship: Examining How Users’ Technological & Organizational Innovations Set the Stage for Entrepreneurial Activity,” in Commons in the Cultural Environment, ed. Brett Frischmann, Michael Madison, and Katherine Strandburg (New York: Oxford University Press, in copyediting).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “University in a Garage: Instrumentation and Innovation in and around UC Santa Barbara,” in Regional Growth: Insights from the University of California, ed. Martin Kenney and David Mowery (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014): 153-179.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Exemplary Cases and Accounting for Research,” in Can Rich Countries Still Invent? Towards a New Model of International Innovation, ed. Christopher Newfield and Daryl Boudreaux (submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Essential Tensions and Representational Strategies,” Representation in Scientific Practice II, ed. Michael Lynch, Steve Woolgar, Janet Vertesi, Catelijne Coopmans (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, forthcoming).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Conferences and the Emergence of Nanoscience,” in The Social Life of Nanotechnology, ed. Barbara Herr Harthorn and John Mohr (London: Routledge, 2012): 52-65.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Conversions: Sound and Sight, Military and Civilian,” in Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies, ed. Trevor Pinch and Karin Bijsterveld (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012): 224-248.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Climbing the Hill: Seeing (and Not Seeing) Epochal Breaks from Multiple Vantage Points,” in Science Transformed?: Debating Claims of an Epochal Break, ed. Alfred Nordmann, Hans Radder, and Gregor Schiemann (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011): 54-65.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Instruments of Commerce and Knowledge: Probe Microscopy, 1980-2000,” in Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, ed. Richard Freeman and Daniel Goroff (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009): 291-319.

Cyrus C.M. Mody and David Kaiser, “Scientific Training and the Creation of Scientific Knowledge,” in Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, ed. Edward J. Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Michael Lynch, and Judy Wajcman, 3rd edition (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2008): 377-402.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Short-Term Implications of Convergence for Scientific and Engineering Disciplines,” in Nanotechnology: Societal Implications II – Individual Perspectives, ed. Mihail C. Roco and William Sims Bainbridge (Dordrecht: Springer, 2006): 161-164.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Instruments in Training: The Growth of American Probe Microscopy in the 1980s,” in Pedagogy and the Practice of Science: Producing Physical Scientists, 1800-2000, ed. David Kaiser (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2005): 185-216.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “How Probe Microscopists Became Nanotechnologists,” in Discovering the Nanoscale, ed. Davis Baird, Alfred Nordmann, and Joachim Schummer (Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2004): 119-133.

White papers:

Cyrus C.M. Mody, Institutions as Stepping-Stones: Rick Smalley and the Commercialization of Nanotubes [Studies in Materials Innovation series] (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2010).

Hyungsub Choi, Sarah Kaplan, Cyrus C.M. Mody, and Jody Roberts, Setting an Agenda for the Social Studies of Nanotechnology [Chemical Heritage Foundation Gore Innovation Case Studies Program/William and Phyllis Mack Center for Technological Innovation] (Philadelphia: Wharton School, 2008).

Cyrus Mody, Research Frontiers for the Chemical Industrial: Report on the Third Annual SCI-CHF Innovation Day Warren G. Schlinger Symposium [Center for Contemporary History and Policy White Paper Series] (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2007).

Cyrus Mody and Arthur Daemmrich, Research Frontiers for the Chemical Industrial: Report on the Second Annual SCI-CHF Innovation Day Warren G. Schlinger Symposium [Center for Contemporary History and Policy White Paper Series] (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2006).

Arthur Daemmrich and Cyrus Mody, Innovation Frontiers in Industrial Chemistry: Report on the First Annual SCI-CHF Innovation Day Warren G. Schlinger Symposium [Center for Contemporary History and Policy White Paper Series] (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2005).

Other articles:

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Professional Scientist,” in Blackwell Companion to the History of Science, ed. Bernard Lightman (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Moore’s Law,” Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Technology, ed. Joseph C. Pitt and Ashley Shew (New York: Routledge, submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Scanning Probe Microscopy,” IEEE STARS/Global History Network (http://ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/STARS:Scanning_Probe_Microscopy)

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Nanotechnology,” in The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Scientific, Medical, and Technological History, ed. Hugh Slotten, et al. (New York: Oxford University Press, accepted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Integrated Circuits: Material, Social, Spatial,” Volume [journal of the Columbia Laboratory for Architectural Broadcasting, issue on “counterculture”] 24 (2010): 44-47.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, entries in Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Society, ed. David H. Guston and J. Geoffrey Golson (London: Sage, 2010): “Chronology of Nanoscience”: xxxiii-xliii; “Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology”: 76-78; “IBM”: 325-328; “Interdisciplinary Research Centers”: 348-350; “International Council on Nanotechnology”: 351-353; “Microscopy, Atomic Force”: 416-417; “Microscopy, Electron (Including TEM and SEM)”: 417-419; “Microscopy, Exotic”: 419-421; “Microscopy, Optical”: 421-422; “Microscopy, Scanning Probe”: 423-424; “Microscopy, Scanning Tunneling”: 424-425; and “National Institute of Standards and Technology (U.S.)”: 580-581.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Introduction [to special issue on the history of nanotechnology],” Perspectives on Science 17.2 (2009): 111-122.

Cyrus Mody and W. Patrick McCray, “Big Whig History and Nano Narratives: Effective Innovation Policy Needs the Historical Dimension,” Science Progress (http://www.scienceprogress.org/2009/04/big-whig-history-and-nano-narratives/), April 6, 2009.

Cyrus Mody, “Buckyball and Carbon Nanotubes,” in Molecules That Matter [exhibit catalog], ed. Raymond J. Giguere (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation, 2008): 159-176.

Cyrus Mody, Patrick McCray, and Jody Roberts, “Debating Nanoethics” [invited letter to the editor], The New Atlantis 17 (2007): 5-8.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Garden of Nanotech: A Role for the Social Sciences and Humanities in Nanotechnology,” Chemical Heritage 25.3 (2007): 38-39.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Chemistry, Microscopy, and the Nanoworld,” Chemical Heritage 24.3 (2006): 14-19.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Nanotechnology and the Modern University,” Practicing Anthropology [special issue on nanotechnology] 28.2 (2006): 23-27.

Essay reviews:

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Visions of Plenty in the Age of Scarcity,” The European Legacy (submitted).

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Faster-than-Light Reading” [review of How the Hippies Saved Physics: Counterculture and the Quantum Revival, by David Kaiser], Social Studies of Science 42 (2012): 159-164.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Fact and Friction” [review of Velvet Revolution at the Synchrotron: Biology, Physics, and Change in Science by Park Doing], Metascience 19 (2010): 493-496.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, the Nuclear Reactor, the Computer, Ham Radio, and Recombinant DNA” [review of five recent books on Cold War science and technology], Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 38.3 (2008): 451-461.[††]

Reviews:

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Failures to Compute” [review of Arguments That Count: Physics, Computing, and Missile Defense, 1949-2012 by Rebecca Slayton], Science 342 (November 15, 2013): 800-801.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, Summer Books review of Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism by Jacob Darwin Hamblin, Nature 499 (July 11, 2013): 151.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Biomedical Computing: Digitizing Life in the United States, by Joseph November, Journal of American History 99.4 (2013): 1321-1322.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Limits Be Damned” [review of The Visioneers: How a Group of Elite Scientists Pursued Space Colonies, Nanotechnologies, and a Limitless Future, by W. Patrick McCray], Nature 493.7430 (3 January, 2013):24-25.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Makers of the Microchip: A Documentary History of Fairchild Semiconductor, by Christophe Lécuyer and David C. Brock, Isis 103. 1 (2012): 210-211.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Genentech: The Beginnings of Biotech by Sally Smith Hughes, Bulletin of the History of Medicine 86.1 (2012): 145-146.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Gravity’s Ghost: Scientific Discovery in the Twenty-First Century, by Harry Collins, Contemporary Sociology 41 (2012): 76-78.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Science-Mart: Privatizing American Science, by Philip Mirowski, Journal of American History 98.3 (2011): 888-889.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Nanoethics: Big Ethical Issues with Small Technology by Dónal P. O’Mathúna, Technology and Culture 52 (2011): 49-51.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of No Small Matter: Science on the Nanoscale by Felice C. Frenkel and George M. Whitesides, Chemical Heritage 28.2 (2010): 47.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Fermilab: Physics, the Frontier, and Megascience by Lillian Hoddeson, Adrienne W. Kolb, and Catherine Westfall, Technology and Culture 51.1 (2010): 279-280.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Managing Path-Breaking Innovations: CERN-ATLAS, Airbus, and Stem Cell Research by Shantha Liyanage, Rüdiger Wink, and Markus Nordberg, Technology and Culture 49 (2008): 514-515.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, “Nano Pop” [review of three recent works on the history and sociology of nanotechnology], Chemical Heritage 25.4 (2007): 45.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Technology, Institutions, and Economic Growth by Richard R. Nelson, Technology and Culture. 47 (2006): 817-819.

Cyrus C.M. Mody, review of Aircraft Stories: Decentering the Object in Technoscience by John Law, Contemporary Sociology 33 (2004): 116-117.

Professional service:

Member of editorial board, History and Philosophy of Technoscience series (Pickering & Chatto, publisher; Alfred Nordmann, series editor).

Contributing editor, Technology and Culture, 2009-present.

Program committee, Society for the Study of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies, 2010 and 2011 meetings.

Melvin Kranzberg Dissertation Fellowship committee, Society for the History of Technology, 2010-2012 (chair, 2012).

Leonardo da Vinci Medal committee, Society for the History of Technology, 2012.

Joan Cahalin Robinson Prize committee, Society for the History of Technology, 2014-2016.

Member, Society for the History of Technology. Occasional member of Society for Social Studies of Science, American Sociological Association, American Anthropological Association, Society for Applied Anthropology.

Reviewer, Bridgepoint Education, Cambridge University Press, Department of Energy, Dutch Council for the Humanities, Engineering Studies, Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences, Hyle, IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, Journal of Biomedical Discovery and Collaboration, Leonardo, Minerva, MIT Press, National Science Foundation, Northwestern University Press, Oxford University Press, Science, Technology & Human Values, Sean Kingston Publishing, Social Studies of Science, Sociology of the Sciences Yearbook, South Carolina EPSCoR/IDeA, Techné, Technology & Culture, Technology Forecasting and Social Change, University of California Press, University of Chicago Press.

University service:

Center for Energy and Environment Research in the Human Sciences faculty steering committee, F13-present

Space Futures symposium planning committee, S12-present

Parking committee, F12-S14

Search committee, Director of Office of Faculty Development, S12

Rice Center for Engineering Leadership internal advisory committee, F09-present

Wiess College Faculty Associate, S09-present

First-year common reading committee, S08-present

Organizing committee of the Celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the Buckminsterfullerene Discovery, S10/F10

Rice Undergraduate Scholars Program, co-instructor (with Lora Wildenthal and Dan Wagner), S09

Humanities Research Center, Cultural Studies of Science and Technology coordinator, F08/F09

Department service:

History department executive committee, F12-present

History department Lunch Lectures & Writing Workshop coordinator, F10-present

History department undergraduate committee, F08-S10

History department graduate committee, F07/S08/S12/S13

Courses:

History 419 “The Cold War and Climate Change,” F13

History 418 “Science, Technology, and the Cold War,” S08/S10

History 417 “Perspectives on Silicon Valley,” F08/S13

History 237/Chemistry 235/Anthropology 235 “Nanotechnology: Content and Context” (with Prof. Kristen Kulinowski), F07/8/9

History/Electrical and Computer Engineering 234 “Technological Disasters,” (with Prof. Kevin Kelly), S09/S10/F10

History 233 “Science in the Modern World,” F07/S09/F09/F10/S13

History 166 “Scientists and Fiction” [first-year seminar], S12

History 348, “Global Histories of Science,” S12

History 317, “Twentieth Century Science,” S14

Graduate pedagogy:

Committee member: Stacey Pereira, Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University (Anthropology), 2014.

External reader for honors evaluation: Joeri Bruyninckx, Sound science: Recording and listening in the biology of bird song, 1880-1980, Ph.D. dissertation, Universiteit Maastricht (Technology and Society Studies), 2012.

Committee member: J. Merritt McKinney, Air pollution, politics, and environmental reform in Birmingham, Alabama, 1940-1971, Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University (History), 2011.

Committee member: Valerie A. Olson, American extreme: An ethnography of astronautical visions and ecologies, Ph.D. dissertation, Rice University (Anthropology), 2010.

Funding:

National Science Foundation Scholar’s Award “The Long Arm of Moore’s Law: New Institutions for Microelectronics Research, 1966-2004,” SES 1027160.

Head of Rice-UCSB team awarded Collaborative Research Fellowship, 2010 funding cycle, American Council of Learned Societies.

Funded as part of Interdisciplinary Research Group 1 of the UC Santa Barbara Center for Nanotechnology in Society, NSF Grant SES 0531184.

Head of three-person Rice-UCSB research team awarded Social and Ethical Issues funding through National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, NSF Grant ECCS 0335765.

Head of three-person Rice-UCSB research team conducting historical/ethnographic project for Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, NSF Grant EEC 0647452

Interviews and news articles:

David Marcus, “Valley Firms Boost Apps, at Cost of Basic Research,” The Daily Deal, March 31, 2014, p. 19.

G.S. Mudur, “Quick-Fix Country at a Jugaad Crossroads – to Junk or Not to Junk a Symbol,” The Telegraph (Calcutta), May 16, 2013.

Brotzen, Franz, “Two Rice Profs Named ACLS Fellows and Grantees,” Rice News, June 11, 2010.

Estrada, Andreas, “National Fellowships Awarded to Scholars in History and English,” 93106, 20.5 (March 2010).

DuBois, Lisa A., “Uncle Sam: Scientist,” and Bill Snyder, “Canary in the Research Lab,” Lens, Winter 2009: 4-9 and 12-16.

Stark, Jessica, “From the Titanic to the Betamax: Interdisciplinary Engineering and Humanities Course Investigates Disasters,” Rice News, January 30, 2009.

KTRU News, (October 19, 2008), interview with Carina Baskett.

“Nanotechnology: Where Did It Come From? What Is It For?” (June 25-27, 2007), interview with Benjamin Cohen, Science Blogs – The World’s Fair

Chen, Laurel, “Mody addresses the politics and the science of silicon chip technologies,” The Amherst Student, December 11, 2006.

Science and Society podcast, (July 30, 2006), interview with David Lemberg.

Mukhopadhyay, Neil, “Panel discusses ethics in science: Researchers explore issues in nanotechnology,” The Cornell Daily Sun, April 12, 2004.

Conferences organized:

(with Ann Johnson and Patrick McCray) Emerging Technologies workshop (Santa Barbara, CA: UCSB Center for Nanotechnology in Society, June 23-25, 2013).

(with Ann Johnson) Instruments in Manufacturing workshop (Houston, Tex.: Rice University, June 17-18, 2009) [supported by NSF and Rice Humanities Research Center].

(with Sarah Kaplan) Joint Wharton-CHF Symposium on Social Studies of Nanotechnology (Philadelphia, Penna.: Wharton School and Chemical Heritage Foundation, June 7-8, 2007) [referenced in Ivan Amato, “Pacing Nanotechnology,” Chemical & Engineering News 85.28 (July 9, 2007): 3].

(with Chi Chan and Arthur Daemmrich) Third Annual CHF-SCI Innovation Day and Schlinger Symposium (Philadelphia, Penna.: Chemical Heritage Foundation, September 20-21, 2006).

(with Maria Alvarez and Arthur Daemmrich) Second Annual CHF-SCI Innovation Day and Schlinger Symposium (Philadelphia, Penna.: Chemical Heritage Foundation, September 6-7, 2006).

Nano Before There Was Nano: Historical Perspectives on the Constituent Communities of Nanotechnology (Philadelphia, Penna.: Chemical Heritage Foundation, March 18-19, 2005) [supported by Gordon and Mary Cain Foundation].

The Significance of Noise (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell Science and Technology Studies, April 8-9, 2000).

Invited single-speaker talks:

“The Tangible and the Esoteric: US Physics in the 1970s” (South Bend, IN: University of Notre Dame Cushing Prize Lecture, April 3, 2014).

“Bridging Disciplines in Times of Crisis: US Physics in the Long 1970s” (Richardson, TX: UT Dallas School of Arts and Humanities, March 5, 2014).

“The Market and the Garden: Civilianization and Commercialization of Research in the Long 1970s” (Seoul: Seoul National University, History and Philosophy of Science Program colloquium, March 1, 2013).

“Replication and Evolution of Research Organizations: The Case of US Academic Microfabrication Facilities” (Daejeon: KAIST Graduate School of Science and Technology Policy colloquium, February 27, 2013).

“Interdisciplinarity and Vietnam-Era Protest at Stanford” (Santa Barbara: Center for Nanotechnology in Society seminar, October 12, 2011).

“The Long Arm of Moore’s Law: The Microelectronics Industry and Nanotechnology” (Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Departments of Industrial Management and History of Science and Technology joint seminar, October 16, 2008).

“Between Success and Scandal: Visionary Scientists and Molecular Electronics” (Göteborg, Sweden: Göteborg University Science and Technology Studies Section seminar, October 14, 2008).

“Institutions as Stepping Stones: Rick Smalley and the Commercialization of Nanotubes” (Göteborg, Sweden: Chalmers Institute of Technology Nanoscience seminar, October 13, 2008).

“Conferences and the Development of Nanotechnology: Two Case Studies” (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation Brown Bag Lunch, May 8, 2007).

“The Long Arm of Moore’s Law” (Amherst, Mass.: Amherst College Law and Science Seminar, November 27, 2006).

“Molecular Electronics in the Longue Durée” (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Department of History and Sociology of Science, November 13, 2006).

“Constituent Communities and the Creation of Nanotechnology” (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Program in Science, Technology, and Society, February 27, 2006).

“Commercializing Probe Microscopy” (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Department of Anthropology, October 24, 2005).

“Universities, Corporations, and Instruments: Commercializing Probe Microscopy” (Philadelphia: Chemical Heritage Foundation Brown Bag Lunch, February 23, 2005).

“Instrumental Communities and the Commercialization of Knowledge” (Tempe: Arizona State University Consortium on Science, Policy, and Outcomes, January 31, 2005).

“On Becoming a Nanoscientist: Shifting Identities in the Probe Microscopy Community” (East Lansing, Mich.: Michigan State University Lyman Briggs School, February 18, 2004).

“On Becoming a Nanoscientist: Shifting Identities in the Probe Microscopy Community” (Blacksburg, Va.: Virginia Tech Department of Science and Technology in Society, January 28, 2004).

“From Replication to Routinization: Putting Probe Microscopy to Work” (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Department of History of Science, November 25, 2003).

“On Becoming a Nanoscientist: Shifting Identities in the Probe Microscopy Community” (San Diego: University of California at San Diego Department of Sociology, November 13, 2003).

“What Does an Existence Proof Prove?: Surface Science and the Topografiner” (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell Science Studies Reading Group, October 28, 2002).

“Scanned Probes and Surface Science: Crafting Communities and Instruments in the ‘80s and ‘90s” (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell Science Studies Reading Group, February 4, 2002).

“Pilgrimage to Zurich: Sorting out the History of Scanning Probe Microscopes,” (Toronto: York University STS Brownbag Research Seminar, February 13, 2001).

“Failed (Auto)Revolution: Ideology, Invention, and the Autogiro” (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell Science Studies Reading Group, March 28, 1998).

Invited workshop talks/papers:

“Probe Microscopy: A Transatlantic and Transdisciplinary Instrumental Community,” (Hamburg: Paul Bunge Prize lecture, Germany Chemical Society/Bunsen Society meeting, May 31, 2014).

Author presentation for forum on “Universities and Regional Growth: Insights from the University of California” (Davis, CA: Provost’s Forums on the Public University and the Social Good, April 22, 2014).

“Synesthesia in the Seventies: Research Reform and the Senses,” (Maastricht, NL: Sonic Skills workshop, January 17, 2014).

“Dad’s in the Garage: Santa Barbara Physicists in the Long 1970s,” (Baltimore: American Physical Society March meeting, March 20, 2013).

“What Do Scientists and Engineers Do All Day? On the Structure of Normal Science” (Cambridge, MA: MIT-Harvard symposium on Thomas Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 50 Years Later: Reflections on the History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science, December 7, 2012).

“Replication and Evolution of Research Organizations: The Case of US Academic Microfabrication Facilities” (Berlin: International Conference on Intellectual and Institutional Innovation in Science, September 14, 2012).

“University in a Garage: Instrumentation and Innovation from UC Santa Barbara” (Berkeley, CA: workshop for edited volume on innovation in the UC system, March 30, 2012).

With Andrew J. Nelson, “‘A Towering Virtue of Necessity’: Computer Music at Vietnam-Era Stanford” (Starkville, Miss.: Osiris 28 Catfish Workshop, September 16-18, 2011).

“An Electro-Historical Focus with Real Interdisciplinary Appeal” (Princeton: Groovy Science – The Countercultures and Scientific Life, 1955-1975, February 4-5, 2011).

“The Political Economy of the Knowledge Economy: Interdisciplinarity at Vietnam-Era Stanford” (Oxford, UK: Scientific Collaboration, Interdisciplinary Pedagogies and the “Knowledge Economy” invited workshop, September 9, 2010).

“Fifty Years of Nanotechnology” (Columbia, SC: Feynman Anniversary Symposium, February 13, 2010).

“Conversions: Sound to Picture, Military to Civilian” (Maastricht: Sound Studies Handbook workshop, November 21, 2009).

“Some Early Historical Observations on the Commercialization of Nanotubes” (Washington, DC: US-France Young Engineering Scientists Symposium ’08, July 8, 2008).

With Michael Lynch (Lynch presenting), “From Dr. Goring to Nanotechnology: Test Objects as Reflexive Instruments” (Columbia, SC: Images of the Nanoscale: From Creation to Consumption workshop, October 27, 2007).

“Conferences, Institutions, and Nanotechnology” (Bielefeld: ZiF workshop on Institutional Fragmentation of Science, June 18, 2007).

With Hyungsub Choi (Mody and Choi presenting), “Molecular Electronics in the Longue Durée: The Microelectronics Origins of Nanotechnology” (Philadelphia: Wharton-CHF Symposium on the Social Studies of Nanotechnology, June 7, 2007).

With Hyungsub Choi (Mody presenting), “Molecular Electronics and the Microelectronics Origins of Nanotechnology,” (Tempe, Ariz.: Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics Symposium, March 16, 2007).

“Building a Probe Microscopy Community” (Chicago: Pittsburgh Conference, 18th Annual James Waters Symposium Recognizing Pioneers in the Development of Analytical Instrumentation, February 26, 2007).

“Some Thoughts on Why History Matters in Understanding the Social Issues of Nanotechnology and Other Converging Technologies” (Madrid: Making the CTEKS workshop, Spanish National Research Council, February 6, 2007).

“Commercializing Probe Microscopy” (Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research Science & Engineering Workforce Project Workshop, October 20, 2005).

“Probe Microscopists at Work and at Play: The Growth of American STM in the 1980s” (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT workshop on Training Scientists, Crafting Science: Putting Pedagogy on the Map for Science Studies, January 25, 2002).

Other Presentations and Conference Activities:

Chair, session on “Engineering and Abstraction in the Twentieth-Century: Idealism, Prediction, and the Innovative Self” [panel organized by Heidi Voskuhl] (Portland, ME: Society for the History of Technology Annual Meeting, October 11-12, 2013).

Commentator and chair, session on “Circulating Expertise” (Portland, ME: Society for the History of Technology Annual Meeting, October 11-12, 2013).

Moderator, session on “Social Construction of Technology” [panel organized by Mike Lounsbury] (New York: American Sociological Association annual meeting, August 10, 2013).

“An Historical Alternatives Approach to the Materials of Microelectronics” (Manchester, UK: International Congress of History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, July 25, 2013).

“The Interdisciplinary Imaginary: Computer Music at Vietnam-Era Stanford” [also organized panel] (Copenhagen: annual meeting of the Society for the History of Technology, October 6, 2012).

Moderator, panel on “Science at the Margins: American Women in Scientific Careers in the Twentieth Century” [panel organized by Jessica Martucci] (Ft. Worth: Southern Association for Women Historians annual meeting, June 9, 2012).

Commentator, panel on “Emerging Technology: The Coevolution of Performances, Regulations, and Markets” [panel organized by Ann Johnson] (Philadelphia: Business History Conference, March 31, 2012).

“What Happens When an Emerging Technology Never Quite Emerges? Josephson Computing in the ‘70s and ‘80s” [also organized panel] (Tempe: annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies, November 9, 2011).

“The Josephson Junction at IBM, 1968-1983,” (Cleveland: annual meeting of the Society for the History of Technology, November 4, 2011).

“Choosing Paths for Research at Vietnam-Era Stanford” (Cleveland: annual meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science, November 3, 2011).

Panel participant, “Leo Marx Meets Some New Readers” (Tacoma: annual meeting of the Society for the History of Technology, October 2, 2010).

Panel participant, “The Feynman Legacy” (Darmstadt, Germany: Society for the Study of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies meeting, September 30, 2010).

“From Microscience to Nanotechnology, 1970-2000,” (Society for Social Studies of Science annual meeting, August 26, 2010).

“Fifty Years of Nanotechnology” (Palo Alto, CA: President’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology NNI Review, panel on environmental, ethical, societal, and legal concerns, February 18, 2010).

“Context in the Classroom: Co-Teaching Our Way to Societal Dimensions of Nano” (Philadelphia: American Anthropological Association annual meeting, December 4, 2009).

“Conversions: Sound to Picture, Military to Civilian” (Pittsburgh: annual meeting of the Society for the History of Technology, October 16, 2009).

With Sonali Shah (Shah presenting), “Innovation, Social Structure and the Creation of New Industries: User Communities as Paths from Innovation to Industry” (Seattle: West Coast Research Symposium, September 11, 2009).

“Institutions as Stepping Stones: Rick Smalley and the Commercialization of Nanotubes” (Seattle: Society for the Study of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies meeting, September 9, 2009).

“Crazy or Brilliant or … ?: Molecular Electronics and the Interpretive Flexibility of Personality” (Washington, DC: Society for the History of Technology annual meeting, October 19, 2007).

“Conferences, Community, and Nanotechnology: From Birth to Rebirth” (Vancouver: Society for Social Studies of Science annual meeting, November 4, 2006).

With Michael Lynch (Mody presenting), “Test Objects and the Materials of Community” (Minneapolis: Society for the History of Technology annual meeting, November 4, 2005).

“Nanotechnology and the Modern University” (Pasadena: Society for Social Studies of Science annual meeting, October 21, 2005).

“Instrumental Communities and the Commercialization of Knowledge” (Philadelphia: American Sociological Association annual meeting, August 15, 2005).

“The History of the AFM” (Ithaca, N.Y.: Panel Discussion on Social and Ethical Issues in Nanoscience and Engineering: What Are They?, National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network/Cornell Nanofabrication Facility, April 8, 2004).

“Intervening Technology, Representing Technique: Probe Microscopy and the Art of the Nanoworld” (Columbia, S.C.: Conference on Imaging and Imagining the Nanoscale, March 4, 2004).

“Studying from the Middle: Following Mediators into the Laboratory” (Berkeley, Cal.: Workshop on Studying Up: The Problems and Prospects of Multi-Sited Ethnography, February 3, 2004).

“Builders, Runners, Users: Adaptations to Commercialization in the Probe Microscopy Community” (Atlanta: Society for Social Studies of Science meeting, October 16, 2003).

“Probe Microscopists at Work and Play: The Growth of American STM and AFM in the 1980s” (Atlanta: American Sociological Association annual meeting, August 16, 2003).

“From the Topografiner to the STM to the AFM: What Probe Microscopy Can Tell Us about Nanoscience Instrumentation” (Columbia, S.C.: Discovering the Nanoscale conference, March 21, 2003).

“Pedagogy and Probe Microscopy: Building Instruments and Instrumentalists” (Milwaukee: Society for Social Studies of Science conference, November 8, 2002).

“The Microscopist’s Apprentice: Managing Diversity in Scanning Probe Microscopy” (Cambridge, Mass.: Society for Social Studies of Science conference, November 3, 2001).

“Instruments of/and Noise: Hearing and Laboratory Practice” (Vienna, Austria: Society for Social Studies of Science conference, September 28, 2000).

“Tending and Attending: Using, Reading, and Listening to Laboratory Artifacts” (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell S&TS Workshop on The Significance of Noise, April 8, 2000).

“Cleanliness is next to . . . ? Purity and Epistemology among Materials Scientists” (San Diego: Society for Social Studies of Science conference, October 30, 1999).

“Jakobson's Deep Impact: A Jakobsonian Reading of the Alvarez Extinction Paper” (Cambridge, Mass.: Conference on The Problem of Evidence, Center for Literary and Cultural Studies, Harvard University, May 14, 1999).

Rice and Houston-area presentations:

“Jack Kilby’s Failed Revolution,” (Houston: CENHS Cultures of Energy spring symposium, April 24, 2014).

“Whose Vision, Who’s Sharing,” (Houston: TEDx Rice, April 12, 2014).

“Physics, Counterculture, and Entrepreneurship: Santa Barbara in the Vietnam Era,” (Hunstville, TX: Sam Houston State physics department colloquium, October 21, 2013).

“Machines of Loving Grace: Cybernetics Meets the Counterculture,” (Houston: CAAM/MATH/STAT 498/698 The Legacy of Norbert Wiener guest lecture, April 9, 2013).

“Dad’s in the Garage: Santa Barbara Physicists in the Long 1970s,” (Houston: CHEM 235 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology guest lecture, March 4, 2013).

With fellow panelists Neal Lane and Kirstin Matthews, “The Future of Science in America” (Houston: Rice Empower, October 29, 2012).

“Safety, Disaster, and Innovation on the High Seas before and after the Titanic” (Houston: Rice University, Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, Titanic course, April 19, 2012).

“Safety, Disaster, and Innovation on the High Seas before and after the Titanic” (Houston: Houston Maritime Museum, April 17, 2012).

“Safety, Disaster, and Innovation on the High Seas before and after the Titanic” (Houston: Houston Museum of Natural Sciences, April 12, 2012).

“Eight Lessons from the Career of Rick Smalley” (Houston: Scientia, November 15, 2011).

With Kevin Kelly, “Technological Disasters: Learning from the Past to Prepare for Tomorrow” (Houston: IEEE Galveston Bay Section monthly meeting, October 27, 2011).

With Kevin Kelly, “Technological Disasters” (Houston: Rice Alumni College, March 19, 2011).

“Interdisciplinarity and Vietnam-Era Protest at Stanford” (Houston: Rice Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology-Student Leadership Council semimonthly lunch talk series, October 28, 2010).

“Microscience/technology and Vietnam-Era Protest at Stanford” (Austin: Microelectronics Research Center talk, October 12, 2009).

With Sonali Shah (Shah presenting), “Innovation, Social Structure and the Creation of New Industries: User Communities as Paths from Innovation to Industry” (Houston: Instruments in Manufacturing workshop, June 18, 2009).

“Institutions as Stepping Stones: Rick Smalley and the Commercialization of Nanotubes” (Houston: Instruments in Manufacturing workshop, June 18, 2009).

“Building an Engineering Profession” (Houston: Rice University, Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, Rice engineering course, February 19, 2011).

“On the Origin of Theses: Locating Darwin in Victorian Science” (Houston: Rice University, Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, Darwin course, February 17, 2009).

“Charles Darwin” (Houston: Museum of Natural Sciences, Darwin course, February 10, 2009).

“Molecular Electronics in the Longue Durée: Microelectronics, Futurism, and Nanotechnology” (Houston: Rice University Department of History, February 12, 2007).

 

Last updated June 24, 2014



[*] Courtesy of Cambridge University Press.  See http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJH for final, definitive version of the article.

[†] Courtesy of SAGE Publications.  See http://sss.sagepub.com/ for final, definitive version of the article.

[‡] Courtesy of SAGE Publications.  See http://sth.sagepub.com/ for final, definitive version of the article.

[§] Courtesy of SAGE Publications.  See http://sss.sagepub.com/ for final, definitive version of the article.

[**] Courtesy of SAGE Publications.  See http://sss.sagepub.com/ for final, definitive version of the article.

[††] Courtesty of University of California Press.  See http://caliber.ucpress.net/loi/hsns for final, definitive version of the article.